Dr Nick Albert   Nick first started at Plant & Food Research in 2003 as a summer student, based in Palmerston North. He continued his studies in partnership with Plant & Food, completing both an MSc and PhD in Plant Molecular Biology. Nick re-joined Plant & Food Research in 2014, after a few years away undertaking postdoctoral research. His research interests include gene regulation, flower colour and how plants protect themselves from environmental stresses. He was recently awarded a Faststart Marsden grant to investigate how a gene silencing mechanism has evolved and contributed to speciation in the genus Antirrhinum (snapdragons).  He has extensive expertise in the gene regulation mechanisms that control anthocyanin pigmentation and the production of other flavonoid compounds, including flavonols and condensed tannins.

Dr Nick Albert

Nick first started at Plant & Food Research in 2003 as a summer student, based in Palmerston North. He continued his studies in partnership with Plant & Food, completing both an MSc and PhD in Plant Molecular Biology. Nick re-joined Plant & Food Research in 2014, after a few years away undertaking postdoctoral research. His research interests include gene regulation, flower colour and how plants protect themselves from environmental stresses. He was recently awarded a Faststart Marsden grant to investigate how a gene silencing mechanism has evolved and contributed to speciation in the genus Antirrhinum (snapdragons).  He has extensive expertise in the gene regulation mechanisms that control anthocyanin pigmentation and the production of other flavonoid compounds, including flavonols and condensed tannins.

  Professor Andrew Allan   Dr Allan has been a plant researcher for 30 years, studying the physiology, cell biology, and genetic makeup of crop plants. Much of his research focuses on new apple and kiwifruit varieties, understanding how the plants will behave in different environments or with different horticultural practices.  He is currently focussed on plant signal transduction, with a recent direction towards projects on transcriptional regulation of anthocyanins, carotenoids and chlorophyll in fruits, flowers and vegetables.  Professor Allan, an expert in plant molecular physiology, is the Director of the Joint Graduate School in Plant and Food Science, which was established by The University of Auckland and Plant & Food Research in 2010.  The graduate school seeks to coordinate postgraduate teaching and research between UOA and PFR.

Professor Andrew Allan

Dr Allan has been a plant researcher for 30 years, studying the physiology, cell biology, and genetic makeup of crop plants. Much of his research focuses on new apple and kiwifruit varieties, understanding how the plants will behave in different environments or with different horticultural practices.  He is currently focussed on plant signal transduction, with a recent direction towards projects on transcriptional regulation of anthocyanins, carotenoids and chlorophyll in fruits, flowers and vegetables.  Professor Allan, an expert in plant molecular physiology, is the Director of the Joint Graduate School in Plant and Food Science, which was established by The University of Auckland and Plant & Food Research in 2010.  The graduate school seeks to coordinate postgraduate teaching and research between UOA and PFR.

  Miles Benton   Miles is a a computational geneticist interested in all facets of biology and technology. He currently works in the Genomics Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology as a PostDoc Research Fellow. In 2014 he completed a PhD exploring the underlying genetic susceptibility to obesity and metabolic disorders in the Norfolk Island population isolate. His main areas of interest are Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics. His current work involves the creation of methods to deal with, and analyse, large genomic data sets, including the incorporation of multiple layers of both phenotypic and genomic data.

Miles Benton

Miles is a a computational geneticist interested in all facets of biology and technology. He currently works in the Genomics Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology as a PostDoc Research Fellow. In 2014 he completed a PhD exploring the underlying genetic susceptibility to obesity and metabolic disorders in the Norfolk Island population isolate. His main areas of interest are Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics. His current work involves the creation of methods to deal with, and analyse, large genomic data sets, including the incorporation of multiple layers of both phenotypic and genomic data.

 
  Bobby Brooks  Ngāti Maniapoto, Tainui, Ngāpuhi  Bobby completed his Bachelor and Masters of Science by the age of 21 before completing a Māori internship in environmental economics as a part of a Graduate Diploma in Economics. At Motu, Bobby worked with Suzi Kerr and the Motu environmental economics team on a review of the Afforestation Grants Scheme. Bobby then took a position as policy and research analyst at the Federation of Māori Authorities, which fosters economic advancement for Māori. Bobby began studying towards his PhD in chemistry at Oxford University in October 2011, having been awarded the Sir Robert Mahuta Scholarship.  He has recently returned to NZ while his PhD gets marked and has had roles with NZ Data Futures Partnership and NZ Police.

Bobby Brooks
Ngāti Maniapoto, Tainui, Ngāpuhi

Bobby completed his Bachelor and Masters of Science by the age of 21 before completing a Māori internship in environmental economics as a part of a Graduate Diploma in Economics. At Motu, Bobby worked with Suzi Kerr and the Motu environmental economics team on a review of the Afforestation Grants Scheme. Bobby then took a position as policy and research analyst at the Federation of Māori Authorities, which fosters economic advancement for Māori. Bobby began studying towards his PhD in chemistry at Oxford University in October 2011, having been awarded the Sir Robert Mahuta Scholarship.  He has recently returned to NZ while his PhD gets marked and has had roles with NZ Data Futures Partnership and NZ Police.

  Dr David Chagne   A Senior Scientist with Plant and Food Research since 2004, Dr Chagné’s research focuses on the application of genetic mapping and genomics to elucidate the genetic control of important plant characters, with a strong underpinning interest in the study of DNA variations in plant genomes.David has catalogued single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apple and pear genomes and identified markers linked to significant traits, including fruit antioxidant content, red flesh and peel, crispness and aroma and further designed a SNP assay that has been used to accurately predict fruit quality of young apple seedlings using genome-wide selection, years before they first set fruit.  He is also an honorary senior research fellow at the University of Otago.

Dr David Chagne

A Senior Scientist with Plant and Food Research since 2004, Dr Chagné’s research focuses on the application of genetic mapping and genomics to elucidate the genetic control of important plant characters, with a strong underpinning interest in the study of DNA variations in plant genomes.David has catalogued single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apple and pear genomes and identified markers linked to significant traits, including fruit antioxidant content, red flesh and peel, crispness and aroma and further designed a SNP assay that has been used to accurately predict fruit quality of young apple seedlings using genome-wide selection, years before they first set fruit.  He is also an honorary senior research fellow at the University of Otago.

     Dr Kirsty Danielson   Kirsty is a Lecturer in the Department of Surgery and Anaesthesia at University of Otago, Wellington. Her research focuses on the development of biomarkers that can be used for the early detection of disease and as predictors of disease prognosis. Her particular interest is in non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression (such as microRNA and piwi-interacting RNA) and how they are altered in, and contribute to, different diseases. Kirsty completed her post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA investigating how these RNA molecules functioned in Type II diabetes and cardiac disease. She returned to New Zealand in 2017 and is now working with surgeons at Wellington Hospital as a part of the Surgical Cancer Research Group to discover new RNA biomarkers for colorectal cancer. 

 Dr Kirsty Danielson

Kirsty is a Lecturer in the Department of Surgery and Anaesthesia at University of Otago, Wellington. Her research focuses on the development of biomarkers that can be used for the early detection of disease and as predictors of disease prognosis. Her particular interest is in non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression (such as microRNA and piwi-interacting RNA) and how they are altered in, and contribute to, different diseases. Kirsty completed her post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA investigating how these RNA molecules functioned in Type II diabetes and cardiac disease. She returned to New Zealand in 2017 and is now working with surgeons at Wellington Hospital as a part of the Surgical Cancer Research Group to discover new RNA biomarkers for colorectal cancer. 

 
  Dr Sara Filoche  (BSc Hons, MSc, PhD)  Sara is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Otago Wellington. She is a biomedical scientist and population health researcher whose work is centered around improving access to healthcare. Her work involves exploring clinical care pathways to better understand where the gaps in health provision are - including for the investigation of uterine cancer, management of gestational diabetes and mental health services. In addition, Sara has a specialist interest in public health genetics, ensuring equitable access to genetic and genomic medicine as it becomes mainstreamed. She is currently leading a programme of work around the introduction of a genetic-based test into prenatal screening services. Sara also co-runs a programme for science teaching with local kura. Outside of work, Sara is a DIY enthusiast and a keen, if not terrible, surfer.

Dr Sara Filoche (BSc Hons, MSc, PhD)

Sara is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Otago Wellington. She is a biomedical scientist and population health researcher whose work is centered around improving access to healthcare. Her work involves exploring clinical care pathways to better understand where the gaps in health provision are - including for the investigation of uterine cancer, management of gestational diabetes and mental health services. In addition, Sara has a specialist interest in public health genetics, ensuring equitable access to genetic and genomic medicine as it becomes mainstreamed. She is currently leading a programme of work around the introduction of a genetic-based test into prenatal screening services. Sara also co-runs a programme for science teaching with local kura. Outside of work, Sara is a DIY enthusiast and a keen, if not terrible, surfer.

  Dr Simon Hills  Ngāti Porou  Simon Hills is from and is a Te Tipu Pūtaiao postdoctoral fellow based at School of Agriculture and Environment at Massey University. He studies the biodiversity of marine molluscs around the East Cape, and is working in collaboration with local iwi.   

Dr Simon Hills
Ngāti Porou

Simon Hills is from and is a Te Tipu Pūtaiao postdoctoral fellow based at School of Agriculture and Environment at Massey University. He studies the biodiversity of marine molluscs around the East Cape, and is working in collaboration with local iwi.

 

  Associate Professor Maui Hudson  Whakatōhea, Ngāruahine, Ngā Puhi  Maui is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato.  He is an interdisciplinary researcher with extensive experience across a diverse range of research areas including traditional medicine, indigenous research ethics, interface between indigenous knowledge and science, Maori economic development and Maori health.  Maui has been a member of a number of national and institutional ethics committees and was part of the team that developed Te Ara Tika: Guidelines on Maori Research Ethics – A framework for researchers and ethics committee members. He is the principal investigator for Te Mata Ira, a research project exploring Maori views on Genomic research and biobanking, and is a co-convener of the SING-Aotearoa programme. 

Associate Professor Maui Hudson Whakatōhea, Ngāruahine, Ngā Puhi

Maui is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato.  He is an interdisciplinary researcher with extensive experience across a diverse range of research areas including traditional medicine, indigenous research ethics, interface between indigenous knowledge and science, Maori economic development and Maori health.  Maui has been a member of a number of national and institutional ethics committees and was part of the team that developed Te Ara Tika: Guidelines on Maori Research Ethics – A framework for researchers and ethics committee members. He is the principal investigator for Te Mata Ira, a research project exploring Maori views on Genomic research and biobanking, and is a co-convener of the SING-Aotearoa programme. 

 
 Professor Greg Jones  Professor Greg Jones, Department of Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine. Greg’s research is focused on identifying markers to aid the detection of cardiovascular diseases.  These include testing for inherited (genetic) and environment-induced (epigenetic) changes that can be detected in simple blood tests.  His group has a strong clinical emphasis, particularly in the areas of heart disease, aortic aneurysm, peripheral arterial disease and varicose veins. Greg leads an international consortium, with members from over a dozen countries, which is examining the inherited risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysm.  In addition, he is leading a national initiative to equitably improve cardiovascular disease screening in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Professor Greg Jones

Professor Greg Jones, Department of Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine. Greg’s research is focused on identifying markers to aid the detection of cardiovascular diseases.  These include testing for inherited (genetic) and environment-induced (epigenetic) changes that can be detected in simple blood tests.  His group has a strong clinical emphasis, particularly in the areas of heart disease, aortic aneurysm, peripheral arterial disease and varicose veins. Greg leads an international consortium, with members from over a dozen countries, which is examining the inherited risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysm.  In addition, he is leading a national initiative to equitably improve cardiovascular disease screening in Aotearoa New Zealand.

  Dr Donia Macartney-Coxon   Dr Donia Macartney-Coxson is a Science Leader in the Health Programme at ESR. She leads a research project in the area of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The team has a particular interest in investigating epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and miRNA, as markers of disease to aid in the identification of better targeted treatment options, and increase our understanding of disease. She is part of the Science Leadership Team for the National Science Challenge Healthier Lives – He Oranga Hauora, which was launched in December 2015. The vision of the Challenge is “Healthier lives for all New Zealanders – a new New Zealand in which the burden of non-communicable diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity) has been substantially reduced and equity in the health of the population has been achieved. Donia is also an Honorary Research Fellow, in The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington. She earned her PhD in microbial and molecular genetics and a BSc in biological sciences (Honours in Genetics) from Birmingham University, United Kingdom

Dr Donia Macartney-Coxon

Dr Donia Macartney-Coxson is a Science Leader in the Health Programme at ESR. She leads a research project in the area of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The team has a particular interest in investigating epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and miRNA, as markers of disease to aid in the identification of better targeted treatment options, and increase our understanding of disease. She is part of the Science Leadership Team for the National Science Challenge Healthier Lives – He Oranga Hauora, which was launched in December 2015. The vision of the Challenge is “Healthier lives for all New Zealanders – a new New Zealand in which the burden of non-communicable diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity) has been substantially reduced and equity in the health of the population has been achieved. Donia is also an Honorary Research Fellow, in The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington. She earned her PhD in microbial and molecular genetics and a BSc in biological sciences (Honours in Genetics) from Birmingham University, United Kingdom

  Alby Marsh   Alby Marsh has responsibility to lead Te Râranga Ahumâra in supporting the social, environmental, economic and cultural aspirations of Mâori by developing research programmes that foster mutually beneficial relationships and deliver real benefit and impact for Mâori. To advance effective business and engagement opportunities with Mâori. The primary focus being to develop strategic relationships with Iwi and Hâpu by encouraging high growth Mâori business and partnering key investors in Mâori research, science and technology.

Alby Marsh

Alby Marsh has responsibility to lead Te Râranga Ahumâra in supporting the social, environmental, economic and cultural aspirations of Mâori by developing research programmes that foster mutually beneficial relationships and deliver real benefit and impact for Mâori. To advance effective business and engagement opportunities with Mâori. The primary focus being to develop strategic relationships with Iwi and Hâpu by encouraging high growth Mâori business and partnering key investors in Mâori research, science and technology.

 
  Aroha Mead  Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Porou  Aroha Te Pareake Mead is from Aotearoa, New Zealand. Aroha has been the global Chair of the IUCN Commission on Environment, Economic and Social Policy and a Senior Lecturer in Māori Business, Victoria Management School, Victoria University of Wellington. She has been involved in indigenous cultural and intellectual property and environmental issues for over 30 years at tribal, national, Pacific regional and international levels. 

Aroha Mead
Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Porou

Aroha Te Pareake Mead is from Aotearoa, New Zealand. Aroha has been the global Chair of the IUCN Commission on Environment, Economic and Social Policy and a Senior Lecturer in Māori Business, Victoria Management School, Victoria University of Wellington. She has been involved in indigenous cultural and intellectual property and environmental issues for over 30 years at tribal, national, Pacific regional and international levels. 

  Dr Katharina Ruckstuhl  Ngāi Tahu, Rangitāne ki Wairau  Dr Ruckstuhl is the Associate Dean Māori at the Otago Business School. She is a cross-disciplinary policy researcher in the areas of Māori language, small business, sci-tech innovation, and ‘social licence’ in the mining industry. She contributed a chapter to The Routledge Handbook of Bioarchaeology in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, examining Māori knowledge frameworks in the context of two case studies that involved the return of kōiwi tāngata (ancestral remains). She is currently leading a research team in a national science challenge – Science for Technological Innovation - looking at how sci-tech can better connect with Māori. Katharina has a number of governance, research and other roles for Ngāi Tahu, at both a pan-tribal and for her local hapū of Kāti Huirapa ki Puketeraki.

Dr Katharina Ruckstuhl
Ngāi Tahu, Rangitāne ki Wairau

Dr Ruckstuhl is the Associate Dean Māori at the Otago Business School. She is a cross-disciplinary policy researcher in the areas of Māori language, small business, sci-tech innovation, and ‘social licence’ in the mining industry. She contributed a chapter to The Routledge Handbook of Bioarchaeology in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, examining Māori knowledge frameworks in the context of two case studies that involved the return of kōiwi tāngata (ancestral remains). She is currently leading a research team in a national science challenge – Science for Technological Innovation - looking at how sci-tech can better connect with Māori. Katharina has a number of governance, research and other roles for Ngāi Tahu, at both a pan-tribal and for her local hapū of Kāti Huirapa ki Puketeraki.

  Dr Manda Safavi   Manda Safavi is an Advisor in the New Organisms team at the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). She has been with the EPA since August 2016. The New Organisms team regulates the importation, development, field testing and release of new organisms in New Zealand, including Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Manda holds a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Otago and a MSc in Biotechnology from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.

Dr Manda Safavi

Manda Safavi is an Advisor in the New Organisms team at the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). She has been with the EPA since August 2016. The New Organisms team regulates the importation, development, field testing and release of new organisms in New Zealand, including Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Manda holds a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Otago and a MSc in Biotechnology from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.

 
  Shirley Simmonds   Raukawa, Ngāti Huri, Ngā Puhi  Shirley is a Māori health researcher, an adult educator and a mother of two young sons, Tamihana and Raukawa.  Her areas of work in Kaupapa Māori research have included the BreastScreen Aotearoa Māori monitoring, the Māori rural health reports, and the recent DHB Māori Health Profile. She has also worked in the areas of Māori health workforce development, Māori health ethics, and has contributed to the development of Kaupapa Māori Epidemiology.  Shirley has a teaching role at the Wellington School of Medicine in both postgraduate and undergraduate courses in Hauora Māori.  She is interested in making Māori health data accessible and useful so that it can help achieve our aspirations of a healthy Māori population, in promoting te reo Māori in health interactions, and in contributing to a health system and research environment that meets the needs of whānau Māori. 

Shirley Simmonds
Raukawa, Ngāti Huri, Ngā Puhi

Shirley is a Māori health researcher, an adult educator and a mother of two young sons, Tamihana and Raukawa.  Her areas of work in Kaupapa Māori research have included the BreastScreen Aotearoa Māori monitoring, the Māori rural health reports, and the recent DHB Māori Health Profile. She has also worked in the areas of Māori health workforce development, Māori health ethics, and has contributed to the development of Kaupapa Māori Epidemiology.  Shirley has a teaching role at the Wellington School of Medicine in both postgraduate and undergraduate courses in Hauora Māori.  She is interested in making Māori health data accessible and useful so that it can help achieve our aspirations of a healthy Māori population, in promoting te reo Māori in health interactions, and in contributing to a health system and research environment that meets the needs of whānau Māori. 

  Donna Marie Warren   Ngati Toa Rangatira  Ko Whitireia te Maunga Ko Parirua te Moana Ko Kenepuru te Awa Ko Tainui te Waka Ko Ngati Toa Rangatira te Iwi Ko Takapuwahia te Marae Ko Donna-Marie Hinekoto Warren toku ingoa.  I have been employed with ESR for 17 years in the Health Group Sector as part of the Laboratory Services providing assistance in various duties from Specimen Reception, Media Preparation and delivery of Samples and Stores based at Kenepuru Science Centre. Also teaching Waiata and Ukulele on a fortnightly basis.

Donna Marie Warren
Ngati Toa Rangatira

Ko Whitireia te Maunga
Ko Parirua te Moana
Ko Kenepuru te Awa
Ko Tainui te Waka
Ko Ngati Toa Rangatira te Iwi
Ko Takapuwahia te Marae
Ko Donna-Marie Hinekoto Warren toku ingoa.

I have been employed with ESR for 17 years in the Health Group Sector as part of the Laboratory Services providing assistance in various duties from Specimen Reception, Media Preparation and delivery of Samples and Stores based at Kenepuru Science Centre. Also teaching Waiata and Ukulele on a fortnightly basis.

  Michelle Thunders   Michelle Thunders is a Senior Lecturer in Pathology and Molecular Medicine currently working at the University of Otago, Wellington in the Department of Pathology. She obtained both a BSc (Hons) and PhD in Human Genetics from University College London and has worked in a variety of academic institutions in the UK and in NZ. She is a strong believer in inclusive genetics education and making knowledge accessible, actionable and meaningful to all. Her research interests are in the analysis of sequencing data, both RNA and epigenomic, to understand health, risk and disease pathogenesis at a molecular level.

Michelle Thunders

Michelle Thunders is a Senior Lecturer in Pathology and Molecular Medicine currently working at the University of Otago, Wellington in the Department of Pathology. She obtained both a BSc (Hons) and PhD in Human Genetics from University College London and has worked in a variety of academic institutions in the UK and in NZ. She is a strong believer in inclusive genetics education and making knowledge accessible, actionable and meaningful to all. Her research interests are in the analysis of sequencing data, both RNA and epigenomic, to understand health, risk and disease pathogenesis at a molecular level.

 
  Dr Phil Wilcox  Ngati Rakaipaaka  Dr Wilcox is a Senior Lecturer in the University of Otago’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and has experience  in applied genomics and statistical genetics. He is the current convenor of MapNet a NZ-wide collective of gene mapping scientists and the Project Leader of the Virtual Institute for Statistical Genetics.  Dr Wilcox also established Te Aroturuki, a group of Maori scientists and advisors who developed a process to assist Western research scientists engage with Maori communities.   He is formally a Kaihautu Maori in both the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge and the BioProtection Research CoRE, and is a mandated spokesman for Ngati Rakaipaaka regarding the Rakaipaaka Health and Ancestry Study. He has worked on genetics of plant species (particularly forest trees) and humans diseases.

Dr Phil Wilcox Ngati Rakaipaaka

Dr Wilcox is a Senior Lecturer in the University of Otago’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and has experience  in applied genomics and statistical genetics. He is the current convenor of MapNet a NZ-wide collective of gene mapping scientists and the Project Leader of the Virtual Institute for Statistical Genetics.  Dr Wilcox also established Te Aroturuki, a group of Maori scientists and advisors who developed a process to assist Western research scientists engage with Maori communities.   He is formally a Kaihautu Maori in both the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge and the BioProtection Research CoRE, and is a mandated spokesman for Ngati Rakaipaaka regarding the Rakaipaaka Health and Ancestry Study. He has worked on genetics of plant species (particularly forest trees) and humans diseases.

  Joseph Yracheta  P’urhepecha and Tarahumara Indians  Joseph Yracheta is an Indigenous American and a working researcher at the Lakota community-based company called Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc.   (MBIRI).   Currently enrolled in the DrPH program at Johns-Hopkins, he works at the intersection of Environmental Health and Genomics. He graduated from the University of Washington’s Pharmaceutic Master’s program in 2014. Graduated with a B.S. from Loyola University-Chicago and began his science career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mr. Yracheta feels that in the burgeoning field of Precision Medicine and Genomics, all Amerindigenous people must engage to ensure return of economic, education and health benefit. The most important outcome would be to encourage & support sustainability of Indigenous culture and sovereignty via the STEM fields. Mr. Yracheta’s origins are from Mexico and his wife and children are enrolled members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST).

Joseph Yracheta
P’urhepecha and Tarahumara Indians

Joseph Yracheta is an Indigenous American and a working researcher at the Lakota community-based company called Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc. (MBIRI). Currently enrolled in the DrPH program at Johns-Hopkins, he works at the intersection of Environmental Health and Genomics. He graduated from the University of Washington’s Pharmaceutic Master’s program in 2014. Graduated with a B.S. from Loyola University-Chicago and began his science career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mr. Yracheta feels that in the burgeoning field of Precision Medicine and Genomics, all Amerindigenous people must engage to ensure return of economic, education and health benefit. The most important outcome would be to encourage & support sustainability of Indigenous culture and sovereignty via the STEM fields. Mr. Yracheta’s origins are from Mexico and his wife and children are enrolled members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST).